Mountie tells Saskatchewan inquest he shot Brydon Witstone because he thought he had a gun - APTN NewsAPTN News

Mountie tells Saskatchewan inquest he shot Brydon Witstone because he thought he had a gun



The Canadian Press
The Mountie who fatally shot Brydon Whitstone says he pulled the trigger because he believed the Indigenous man had a gun.

Whitstone, who was 22, died on Oct. 21, 2017, following a police pursuit.

Const. Jerry Abbott told an inquest that when he arrived on scene the car that Whitstone was driving was already boxed in by police vehicles at a North Battleford intersection, but Whitstone was still trying to get away.

He says Whitstone appeared to reach for something in his pocket which he thought was a gun, so he shot the Onion Lake man twice in the chest.

Earlier this week, jurors heard that Whitstone did not have a gun, though he did have ammunition in his pocket.

Several other RCMP on duty the night of the shooting had similar recollections, many referring to the pursuit as a “high-risk” situation.

Whitstone’s parents spoke outside the courthouse following Abbott’s testimony.

His mother, Dorothy Laboucane, said Whitstone was a loving father, brother and son. She said she will never forgive Abbott.

“Const. Abbott took my son,” she said Wednesday. “The pain I carry every day. And I will forever, physically, every day as I struggle.”

Laboucane said she believes her son fled from police because he was on probation and had already breached his curfew.

In earlier testimony, RCMP Const. Matthew McKay told the inquest that the car Whitsone was driving had crashed into two police vehicles and was badly damaged before it finally came to rest.

An investigation by Regina police determined no criminal charges should be filed against police in the shooting.

The inquest is expected to conclude Friday.

 

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One Response to “Mountie tells Saskatchewan inquest he shot Brydon Witstone because he thought he had a gun”

  1. howardsquirrel@gmail.com'
    howard December 8, 2018 at 4:54 pm #

    so damn easy for a aboriginal to be shot as we get looked down at either we have weapons or they assume all criminal activity when being persuaded by the law.. we as oboriginals first nations we get attacked for no reason when a person is wearing a badge.. its not that hard to see when the person says he thought he had a weapon.. as the person says he didnt ask the guy if he any weapons yet after they shot he had shells in his pocket.. same simalarity to any case upon aboriginal people.. its a hear say on it and will be called not racial profiling.. look into all cases upon rcmp and upon aboriginal ancestry.. like the jurror or prosecutor they will be like case dismissed our officer is safe in the arms of duty.. natives get the shit end of the stick.. I’ve been assaulted numerous times by someone who wears a badge and do u think Aboriginals felt safe after one white guy shot a native man.. nope all white farmers though they can shoot us even as we drive on rular roads.. its all the same text and format just a badge in between any conflict.. take away a badge and what the guy would get away with murdering