Elder evicted from home on Whitefish River First Nation - APTN NewsAPTN News

Elder evicted from home on Whitefish River First Nation

 

Annette Francis
APTN News
For the second time in three years, an Elder from a Northern Ontario First Nation has been forced from her home.

Marie McGregor Pitawanakwat, 65, was forced from her home on the Whitefish First Nation where commercial development may be possible in the future.

The band says it did everything it could to provide her with a new home.

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2 Responses to “Elder evicted from home on Whitefish River First Nation”

  1. bezhikwe@gmail.com'
    Marie McGregor Pitawanakwat September 28, 2018 at 7:10 pm #

    Greetings, Thank you to Annette Francis and Jason for coming to Camp In The Woods to do a story on Elder Eviction. If I may point out an inaccuracy: Whitefish River First Nation’s “band council” was not in the least bit concerned about my health and safety during the period 2012 – 2015 when Robert J. McGregor harassed, stalked, threatened, and attempted to intimidate me into leaving the “old house” my late parents gave me. The only reason Whitefish River ‘s “band council” expressed any concern for my well-being was when it became apparent to them that I had independently set up my own tiny home on ancestral Anishinaabe land without need of their “housing program”. The “band council” did not do everything it could to provide me with a home – it attempted to coerce me into accepting a plot of land not of my choosing, nowhere near the water. Marie McGregor Pitawanakwat

  2. b*******@gmail.com'
    Marie McGregor Pitawanakwat February 19, 2019 at 10:20 pm #

    Greetings, Thank you to Annette Francis and Jason for coming to Camp In The Woods to do a story on Elder Eviction. If I may point out an inaccuracy: Whitefish River First Nation’s “band council” was not in the least bit concerned about my health and safety during the period 2012 – 2015 when Robert J. McGregor harassed, stalked, threatened, and attempted to intimidate me into leaving the “old house” my late parents gave me. The only reason Whitefish River ‘s “band council” expressed any concern for my well-being was when it became apparent to them that I had independently set up my own tiny home on ancestral Anishinaabe land without need of their “housing program”. The “band council” did not do everything it could to provide me with a home – it attempted to coerce me into accepting a plot of land not of my choosing, nowhere near the water. Marie McGregor Pitawanakwat