Kashechewan mother says she was told to give daughter a bleach bath to cure her daughter’s skin sores - APTN NewsAPTN News

Kashechewan mother says she was told to give daughter a bleach bath to cure her daughter’s skin sores



Kathleen Martens
APTN NEWS
A Kashechewan First Nation mother says she has been given several remedies to cure her daughter’s painful skin sores including the latest, a bleach bath.

Arlene Nakogee shared a number of photos of her young daughter who has open sores covering much of her body, and face.

The bleach bath is one of several solutions the family has heard as it struggles to treat the 10-month-old’s red, itchy rash.

The latest diagnosis is impetigo, said Muskego, who has also been told her daughter has eczema.

But she says prescription drugs and creams have failed to clear up the lesions she blames on mould in their 30-year-old home.

Grandfather William Nakogee said he did his own experiment and sent the toddler to spend a night with her other grandparents who have a new home.

He said she seemed to improve and then things got worse when she came back to his house, he said.

It’s not the first case of skin lesions in Kashechewan.

In 2016, 16 children were airlifted to hospitals in southern Ontario to be treated for skin lesions.

Chief Leo Friday said at the time he was considering declaring a state-of-emergency.

Friday was out of the community Wednesday and not available for comment.

Kashechewan sits on a flood plain and was twice evacuated in recent years when the Albany River spilled its banks.

Arlene says she’s been told to prepare for another evacuation due to spring breakup and will use that opportunity to take her daughter to a hospital in Timmins, Ont.

Her NDP-MP called that “third world” medical care.

“The only way she can get out is on a flood evacuation flight,” said Charlie Angus (Timmins-James Bay).

“Is this how we do emergency medical treatment for children?”

The health situation highlights the difference in medical care on and off First Nations.

Arlene says a nurse at the community’s health centre told her her daughter was quite ill and should be seen every day.

Yet the girl doesn’t seem to be sick enough to rate an emergency flight out.

“One doctor said not to medivac her out. He said it wasn’t that serious,” Arlene said.

APTN News contacted the medical centre in Kashechewan but calls were not returned.

Back in 2016, APTN visited another family whose home had mould issues.

Angus said the young patient needs to be assessed by a skin specialist.

“She has to get out of that environment and get a proper diagnosis. The Benadryl’s not working,” he said.

William agreed.

“I’m not going to soak my granddaughter in bleach,” he said.

An online dermatology site does say mild bleach baths are an accepted way to combat moderate to severe eczema.

kmartens@aptn.ca

@katmare

 

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7 Responses to “Kashechewan mother says she was told to give daughter a bleach bath to cure her daughter’s skin sores”

  1. Crazyfox@telus.net'
    Tracey April 26, 2018 at 2:33 am #

    Ultraviolet light treatments for ecszema

    • empathy@hotmail.com'
      Empathetic April 26, 2018 at 12:54 pm #

      Well, Tracey, I’m sure if she had access to ultraviolet light treatments she wouldn’t be contemplating a bleach bath or complaining about a lack of access to care now would she?

      • Wynne1987@hotmail.com'
        Annoyed April 27, 2018 at 3:21 am #

        Why don’t u suggest where she can get this so called ultra light treatments…list them!!

        • boatbuilderian@gmail.com'
          Ian April 29, 2018 at 9:42 am #

          I use an ultraviolet lamp for psoriasis. Due to the good old American health system and a $5000 deductible–I refused treatment and ordered a Narrow Band Ultraviolet-B lamp on the internet. It was affordable and is very helpful. It shipped from Israel.

  2. rosiejack1234@gmail.com'
    Rose hack April 26, 2018 at 4:27 pm #

    Only in Kanada you say

  3. jeffreydeb2@gmail.com'
    Deborah Jeffrey April 27, 2018 at 2:09 am #

    The little darling needs to get out of that house like her grandfather says. Why is it so hard to Government to help?

  4. 1234@hotmail.com'
    Poor Article April 27, 2018 at 10:23 pm #

    Did you do your research properly or just want to write an inflammatory article? You have a one liner at the bottom of the article stating “An online dermatology site does say mild bleach baths are an accepted way to combat moderate to severe eczema”. So this shows that the information given to the family was potentially correct and the best possible advice despite your whole article slating this advice.
    This is poor journalism, without actually completing any adequate research. And to state that a homemade experiment for one night is ok? That is worth nothing in science.