85 First Nations, Tribes call on Trudeau to condemn Enbridge for involvement in Dakota pipeline project - APTN NewsAPTN News

85 First Nations, Tribes call on Trudeau to condemn Enbridge for involvement in Dakota pipeline project



APTN National News
An anti-pipeline Indigenous treaty alliance on Monday issued a call for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to condemn Enbridge Inc.’s role in the Dakota Access Pipeline project which is facing fierce resistance from Native Americans in North Dakota.

The Treaty Alliance, which was formed to oppose oil pipeline projects in Canada, says it now has 85 First Nations and Tribes signed up to support the cause.

The group said in a statement it wants Trudeau to weigh in on the situation unfolding near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota where Native American-led demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline have faced heavy police and National Guard actions against their protests.

“It is time for the prime minister, who has stated that no relationship is more important to him than the one with Indigenous peoples, to take a stand in support of the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and allied nations as they resist the Dakota access pipeline,” said Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, in the statement. “We are talking about a Canadian company committing severe human rights violations and some of its victims are brave water protectors and land defenders from First Nations up north.”

See Related Stories here: Standing Rock

The statement said Enbridge, through its Enbridge Energy Partners, owns a $1.5 billion or 27.6 per cent share of the Dakota Access pipeline. The pipeline is slated to ship fracked oil from the Bakken fields in North Dakota.

The pipeline would cross beneath the Missouri River, which the Standing Rock Tribe says threatens the region’s water and construction has also destroyed burial sites and sacred areas, according to the tribe.

“There is a battle being waged across the globe by Indigenous people and their allies demanding a safe world for future generations. This about water versus oil, life versus death,” said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. “It is time to choose Mr. Prime Minister—to be silent is to be complicit.”

However, Trudeau supported a previous U.S. oil pipeline—the Keystone XL pipeline—which was set to cross through South Dakota. That pipeline faced widespread opposition from Native American groups including the seven tribes of the Lakota Nation.

The administration of U.S. President Barack Obama rejected the Keystone XL pipeline.

The Obama administration also stopped work on the Dakota Access Pipeline around the Missouri River and asked the company behind the project to stop construction within a large buffer zone. Energy Transfer Partners, the main firm behind the project, chose to continue construction.

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4 Responses to “85 First Nations, Tribes call on Trudeau to condemn Enbridge for involvement in Dakota pipeline project”

  1. ramhunter@telus.net'
    AMH4 October 31, 2016 at 10:05 pm #

    It’s a sad commentary on government when Obama has to ‘ask’ the pipeline company to stop construction! The power is all with the corporations! Can Trudeau’s voice make a difference? I certainly hope so!

  2. ramhunter@telus.net'
    AMH4 October 31, 2016 at 10:05 pm #

    It’s a sad commentary on government when Obama has to ‘ask’ the pipeline company to stop construction! The power is all with the corporations! Can Trudeau’s voice make a difference? I certainly hope so!

  3. ambercory2015@gmail.com'
    Cory November 1, 2016 at 4:36 pm #

    I remember when Justin Trudeau spoke at the ‘Tu beta Ts’ena’ (water is life) conference of 2007, in fort smith, NT Canada. One would think if you are a guest speaker at these types of conferences that you wouldn’t have to think twice about this decision

  4. ambercory2015@gmail.com'
    Cory November 1, 2016 at 4:36 pm #

    I remember when Justin Trudeau spoke at the ‘Tu beta Ts’ena’ (water is life) conference of 2007, in fort smith, NT Canada. One would think if you are a guest speaker at these types of conferences that you wouldn’t have to think twice about this decision