Winnipeg students grow rare squash from seeds 800 years old



News that not only informs, but inspires.

APTN National News
Students in Winnipeg were given a rather unique opportunity to revive a vegetable that was thought to be extinct.

This particular squash was grown from seeds that are approximately 800 years old.

APTN’s Matt Thordarson has the story.

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14 Responses to “Winnipeg students grow rare squash from seeds 800 years old”

  1. joshdrozda@gmail.com'
    Josh D September 29, 2015 at 1:12 am #

    Wow this is a really great story, glad to see students taking part!

  2. chris@chriscartwright.com'
    Chris Cartwright September 29, 2015 at 1:15 am #

    cool!

  3. dfrancoy01@gmail.com'
    D-Mom September 29, 2015 at 2:46 am #

    How do we get seeds?

    • fortunecooki@hotmail.com'
      sourgrapes22 September 29, 2015 at 8:01 pm #

      Same way farmers got seeds 800 years ago. . .

  4. treewithroots@gmail.com'
    Amber Harvey September 29, 2015 at 3:16 am #

    Great to see that these squash could be grown from such old seeds. I hope it’s tasty and nutritious, as well.

  5. mcgrathp@yahoo.ca'
    Peter September 29, 2015 at 11:28 am #

    Would love to get some seeds from this squash….

  6. Ritap7993@gmail.com'
    Theresa September 29, 2015 at 3:15 pm #

    How were these seeds preserved? I think that would interesting to find out.

  7. anthonyj__@hotmail.com'
    AssHat900 September 29, 2015 at 3:48 pm #

    And then they murdered it.

  8. darksideblues42@gmail.com'
    Darksideblues42 September 29, 2015 at 4:19 pm #

    Point of order – This is a fruit. It is not a vegetable.

    Aside from that, this is pretty darn amazing!

  9. allanpostgate@btinternet.com'
    Allan Postgate September 29, 2015 at 5:59 pm #

    But is it resistant to glyphosate?

  10. crystalnewage@gmail.com'
    ccurtiss September 29, 2015 at 6:34 pm #

    where is the story? i keep getting returned to a tweet about the story.

  11. kims@arialife.com'
    kimsaria September 29, 2015 at 8:05 pm #

    Watch the video… it tells how they were stored.

  12. dustin.bajer@gmail.com'
    Dustin Bajer September 29, 2015 at 8:17 pm #

    Amazing!! Indigenous crops like corn and swash are prime examples of a commensal relationship between plants and humans. They are an important part of our collective heritage. Every time a variety is saved, so to is a way of knowing the world.

  13. alanblanes@shaw.ca'
    manifesto2000 September 29, 2015 at 9:19 pm #

    Council of Canadians at the 2013 AGM in Saskatoon passed a resolution on inviting the Indigenous culture in Canada to take the lead on finalizing the Canadian Constitution. This would be based on authentic values and protections of the founding societies of Turtle Island. It is worth getting a copy of that resolution, and discussing the ways of getting this concept adopted as a basis of community.

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